Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 14:6-7

3/20/15

(6) That great day of the Lord will be unlike other days. It says literally that the precious ones will congeal. This is variously interpreted. Some understand it to mean that the sun, moon, and stars will not shine or will be darkened (NASB, AMP). Some see it as a simple absence of light (YNG). Others understand qapa’ to indicate frost, and a slight change in the Hebrew can change the meaning of yeqar to cold (ESV, NIV, NRSV). The KJV says that the light will be neither clear nor dark. The LXX says that there will be no light, cold, or frost.

(7) It will truly be a unique day this day of the Lord. It will be neither day nor night, but when evening comes light will arrive. The overall impression is that at the third coming of Christ after the millennium the natural order of things will be changed. The day/night cycle will change, at least for that day; but the lack of light does not bring with it the cold and frost that would normally accompany the darkness. At the time of evening, however, light comes upon the earth. Since this is connected with the descent of the New Jerusalem it seems reasonable to understand that this is the fulfillment of passages like Isa 60:1-3, 19-20; Luke 1:78, Rev 21:23-25, 22:5. The glory of the New Jerusalem and the throne of God brilliantly arrives and settles on the plain.

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A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

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Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 14:3-4

3/17/15

(3) The Lord would fight for Jerusalem on the day of the Lord. It is a day that other prophets connect with the day of His wrath when He will destroy the wicked (Isa 63:1-6, 66:15-16; Dan 2:34-35; Joel 3:2, 9-17; Ezek 30:3, Rev 11:18). The attack of Gog in Ezek 38:18-23 and Rev 20:7-9 in particular seems to parallel this description, which means that this verse has moved beyond the Second Coming to the Third Coming. Such “telescoping” of final events is common, particularly in the OT. In other words, like mountains from a distance look like they are stacked two dimensionally upon each other, so events at the end of time are often dealt with together as though happening at the same time, even though in reality there is distance between the events.

(4) The Mount of Olives is mentioned only here and in one other place in the OT. However, it figures prominently in the NT, particularly in relation to Jesus. It it was predicted that Jesus would come back in the same way that He went, which evidently includes descending upon the same mountain.

On this day of final judgment Christ would come and stand on the Mount of Olives on the east of Jerusalem and the effect would be that the mountain would split down the middle from east to west with half the mountain moving toward the north and the other half toward the south creating a large valley or a plain (verse 10). Again, this is the way the scene would have played out had Jerusalem been faithful to God and lasted until the end of the world. Much of this description will still take place at the end of the millennium with the New Jerusalem, but not in every detail since God’s original plans were foiled by Israel’s disobedience.

The mountain becoming a plain or valley casts back to Zech 4:7 where the mountain would become a plain for Zerubbabel. In the same way Christ will rebuild the earth to the shouts of His people. Mic 1:3-4, Nah 1:5, also Hab 3:6 also predicted the mountains melting, dissolving, and shattering under Him.

___________________________________________________

A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

For more information and to purchase books by Jeff Scoggins visit Skapto Publishing.

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Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 12:3

2/28/15

(3) The two other time we have encountered the stone in Zechariah it was a reference to Jesus Christ (Zech 3:9, 10:4). So it seems that there is likely a similar allusion here, particularly when we add Matt 21:44 to the mix. Like Jesus, any who lifted that stone to the cross would be crushed by that stone eventually falling on them. In this verse Jerusalem is the stone and any who gather against her will be severely cut. The only other place the word yisaretu is used is Lev 21:5 where Israel was forbidden to cut themselves. This reminds me too of Dan 2:34, 45 when the stone cut out without hands destroyed the last kingdom of Nebuchadnezzar’s image.

The LXX says that Jerusalem will become a trampled stone and that everyone who tramples it will mock it and the nations of the earth will gather themselves against it, but, in the next verse, God does not allow this.

In Zech 14 the same scenario is repeated with even more eschatological hints. After the millennium Satan will gather the nations to attack the New Jerusalem and will be destroyed by fire (Rev 20:7-10). Several other pre-millennial instances of spiritual Israel being attacked are found in Rev 16:14, 17:12-14, 19:19-21.

___________________________________________________

A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

For more information and to purchase books by Jeff Scoggins visit Skapto Publishing.

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