Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 14:12

3/24/15

Rot

(12) Continuing with the judgment theme against the wicked, the Lord will punish with a plague those who have fought against Jerusalem. Their flesh will rot where they stand, their eyes in their holes, and their tongues in their mouths. The LXX says that their flesh and tongues will dissolve and their eyes will flow out of their holes. However, this rotting away will take some time as becomes clear in the following verses.

This rotting away, maqaq, is the explicit consequence of breaking the covenant, according to Lev 26:39. And the cause of this rotting of their flesh was their sins. Ps 38:5, Ezek 4:17, 24:23, 33:10 also connect rotting flesh with sin. Such rotting away is probably synonymous with the wasting diseases and sickness that Deut 28 lists among the curses for failure to keep the covenant. Two examples of this punishment came upon Jehoram (2 Chr 21:15-19) and Herod Antipas (Acts 12:23). It likely also sheds some light on the cryptic phrase “their worm shall not die” in Isa 66:24 and Mark 9:48, which is connected to the death of the wicked at the end and also with Satan’s end in Isa 14:11. Isa 51:8 also says that worms will devour the wicked.

The first of the seven angels who pour out the seven bowls of God’s wrath on the earth pours out a plague of terrible sores upon the wicked. The parallels here are intriguing, particularly when seen in the light of the promise in Lev 26:16-28 that if after the first curses the people still refused to obey the Lord, then He would punish them seven times more for their sins.

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A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

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Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 12:4-5

3/1/15

(4) In the second “in that day” statement the Lord declared that he would strike horses and riders with confusion, madness, and blindness. These are the same three words of Deut 28:28 where these would be the resulting curses upon Israel for unfaithfulness to the covenant. Since Israel had been unfaithful to the covenant they had experienced these devastating problems. But here God promised to reverse the curses and throw them upon their enemies instead as He had promised to do in Deut 30:7, Isa 29:7-10, and in Zech 9:8,10:5.

The Bible is replete with such examples of divine peripity, e.g. Daniel and the lions or Mordecai and Haman where the very things Israel’s enemies intended to do to them came back on them. The story of Elisha and the Arameans comes to mind here as well. At Elisha’s request God struck them with blindness (2 Kgs 6). God had promised Israel at the dedication of Solomon’s temple that if His people would return to Him he would “open His eyes” toward them (1 Kgs 8:29).

Given the end-time scenario we saw in the last verse Ezek 39:20 and Rev 19:18-19 might also inform this verse with the destruction of horses and riders that array themselves against Jerusalem.

(5) Then the leaders of Judah would understand that God is their strength through the inhabitants of Jerusalem. In times past Jerusalem was shut up in safety while invaders like Sennacherib pillaged the towns around them. It seems here and in the next verse that we have a picture of both those who live in Jerusalem and those who live in the surrounding areas fighting their common enemy together. The leaders of thousands outside of Jerusalem would recognize that they had true allies within Jerusalem. Evidently the separation of the inhabitants of Jerusalem versus those who lived outside of the city in other towns was a big deal. Neh 11 describes in detail how the leaders and others were chosen to live in the city while others lived in other locations.

Again in an eschatological link, Dan 11:32 says that the king of the North will corrupt those who have violated the covenant, but the people who know their God will firmly resist him.

___________________________________________________

A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

For more information and to purchase books by Jeff Scoggins visit Skapto Publishing.

Follow Jeff Scoggins on Twitter

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