Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 14:13-14

3/25/15

(13) As a result of the plague(s) falling upon them, the wicked will be seized with panic. In their panic they will seize each other’s hands and will raise their hands against each other. This means that they will begin to fight against one another. This is what happened in the story of Gideon (Judg 7:22) and the story of the Ammonites, Moabites, and Mount Seir (2 Chr 2:23). It is also Isaiah’s prediction in Isa 13:4 and Jesus’ predictions in Matt 24:7, Mark 13:8, and Luke 21:10; and also in Revelation when the ten horns destroy the scarlet beast in Rev 17:16. In the end the wicked turn on each other. Ezekiel’s prediction in Ezek 38:17-22 concerning Gog has so many parallels to Zechariah’s prophecy that it is clearly speaking of the same event, at least in general terms.

(14) Judah will also fight in or at Jerusalem. This seems to parallel Zech 12:5-7 where Judah and Jerusalem are cooperating in their fight against their attackers. This, it seems to me, is continuing the scenes of verses 1 and 2, which is of the purifying tribulation of God’s people. Probably the story of the Aramean siege of Jerusalem is in the background here. Jerusalem was nearly starved when God miraculously sent the Aramean’s fleeing and the people of Jerusalem went out and plundered the camp in great abundance.

Isa 23:18 also speaks about how the harlot’s wages will be devoted to the Lord and how her spoil will be given to God’s people. So once again we see the picture of how in the end God will bring His people through the final events of earth’s history and will reward them lavishly for their faithfulness.

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A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

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Bible prophecy, commentary, Minor prophets, zechariah

Zech 12:4-5

3/1/15

(4) In the second “in that day” statement the Lord declared that he would strike horses and riders with confusion, madness, and blindness. These are the same three words of Deut 28:28 where these would be the resulting curses upon Israel for unfaithfulness to the covenant. Since Israel had been unfaithful to the covenant they had experienced these devastating problems. But here God promised to reverse the curses and throw them upon their enemies instead as He had promised to do in Deut 30:7, Isa 29:7-10, and in Zech 9:8,10:5.

The Bible is replete with such examples of divine peripity, e.g. Daniel and the lions or Mordecai and Haman where the very things Israel’s enemies intended to do to them came back on them. The story of Elisha and the Arameans comes to mind here as well. At Elisha’s request God struck them with blindness (2 Kgs 6). God had promised Israel at the dedication of Solomon’s temple that if His people would return to Him he would “open His eyes” toward them (1 Kgs 8:29).

Given the end-time scenario we saw in the last verse Ezek 39:20 and Rev 19:18-19 might also inform this verse with the destruction of horses and riders that array themselves against Jerusalem.

(5) Then the leaders of Judah would understand that God is their strength through the inhabitants of Jerusalem. In times past Jerusalem was shut up in safety while invaders like Sennacherib pillaged the towns around them. It seems here and in the next verse that we have a picture of both those who live in Jerusalem and those who live in the surrounding areas fighting their common enemy together. The leaders of thousands outside of Jerusalem would recognize that they had true allies within Jerusalem. Evidently the separation of the inhabitants of Jerusalem versus those who lived outside of the city in other towns was a big deal. Neh 11 describes in detail how the leaders and others were chosen to live in the city while others lived in other locations.

Again in an eschatological link, Dan 11:32 says that the king of the North will corrupt those who have violated the covenant, but the people who know their God will firmly resist him.

___________________________________________________

A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

For more information and to purchase books by Jeff Scoggins visit Skapto Publishing.

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Bible prophecy, Minor prophets, old testament, zechariah

Zech 10:5-7

2/13/15

(5) Because God is with them His people are mighty in battle—physical battle in Judah’s time, spiritual battle today—trampling their enemies in the mud and putting to shame those who ride on horses. As mentioned in Zech 9:10, God had forbidden horses and chariots to Israel because everyone needed to understand that they did not win their battles due to their own might or their own power but by God’s Spirit. So those with inferior battle equipment would put to shame those with superior equipment. Even a feeble person would be a great warrior like an angel of the Lord (Zech 12:8). God had conquered the Egyptian horses and chariots for Israel at the Red Sea. He conquered Sennacharib’s horses and chariots by sending an angel to slay them. He conquered Aram’s horses and chariots when He blinded them for Elisha. Zech 12:4 promised that He would blind them again for the sake of Israel.

Treading down the enemy was also something the Messiah accomplished in Isa 63:3. Mal 4:3 predicts the same with definite end-time overtones. Crushing the enemy casts all the way back to Adam and Eve’s fall in the garden when God promised to crush the serpent’s head via the woman, which is a symbol for His people.

(6) He would stengthen and save His people because He has compassion for them. Though he had rejected them due to their unfaithfulness, their relationship with Him would be reconciled to such a degree that it would be like He had never rejected them. He would once again be their God who answers them.

(7) Ephraim (representing the northern tribes) would also become mighty warriors and they would be so filled with joy would seem like they had been drinking. The inference is that prior to this, during their unfaithfulness to God, they were unhappy and it affected their children, as is always the case. But when their parents come back to the Lord the children will see it and be glad as well, rejoicing in their hearts. A family that is faithful to God is a happy family!

______________________________________________________________

A Simple Guide to Paul's EpistlesYou Can Understand the Book of Revelation

For more information and to purchase books by Jeff Scoggins visit Skapto Publishing.

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